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  • capfedwomensway 8:09 am on July 20, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Who Manages The Money? 

    Last week on ‘What Do You Think’ Wednesday, we asked at what age you opened your first bank account.  67% of our voters said they started banking when they were in middle or high school.  20% responded that they started even earlier, and 13% started their accounts after high school, when they left home for the first time.

    There may be a wide range of opinion on this week’s poll. How do you do it at your house?



    >> Join the discussion. Tell us how you do things in your family.

     
    • capfed 10:08 am on July 21, 2011 Permalink | Reply

      We had a voter choose ‘Other’. She said, “Share half and half” to our What Do You Think Wednesday question this week.

  • capfedwomensway 9:37 am on July 13, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    When Did You Start Banking? 

    Reach back into your memory for the ‘What Do You Think’ question this week…



    >> Would you change anything –– maybe start your banking experience earlier? Or did you rush into it too soon? Click Reply above to leave your opinion.

     
  • capfedwomensway 8:02 am on July 6, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Do You Follow A Budget? 

    ‘What Do You Think’ Wednesday this week asks about family budgeting. Do you do it?



    >> So, what do you think? Do you stick to a budget? Do you think it matters? Join the discussion.


    Click here for more information on putting together a household budget.

     
  • capfedwomensway 8:54 am on June 15, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Will You Be Pampering Pop? 

    In honor of Father’s Day this Sunday, our ‘What Do You Think’ Wednesday question deals with Dad.


    >> Let’s talk. What are your thoughts on pampering Papa?

     
  • capfedwomensway 8:36 am on June 8, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Should Kids Get An Allowance? 

    It is once again ‘What Do You Think’ Wednesday.
    And, today’s discussion can sometimes touch a nerve with people…


    >> So, where do you stand on the allowance issue? Let us know what you think!


    We had some comments on the replies to a few of our poll votes on this question. One voter replied, “and it should be a set amount not driven by the number of chores they complete,” while another said, “if they don’t do their chores, they are ‘fined’ as opposed to earning.”

    What do you think?

     
  • capfedwomensway 10:38 am on June 7, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Kids and Money 

    For parents, talking to children about money can be a difficult task. According to a survey released by ING Direct USA, 95% of parents assert they’re accountable for their children’s financial education, but only 29% believe they are excellent financial role models.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.

    Here are some lessons to teach your kids about money:

    • Be a money-wise adult.  Personal finance expert Suze Orman states, “The single most important step in raising a money-wise child is simply for parents to be money-wise adults themselves.”  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.
    • Let kids make their own mistakes.  In her article “8 ways to teach your kids about money,” Kimberly Palmer, Senior editor for U.S. News & World Report, reaffirms Finance Professor Lewis Mandell’s belief that allowing children to experiment and make mistakes can provide more useful lessons than anything taught in school.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.
    • Teach the value of money.  When shopping with children, Suze Orman suggests you set limits and don’t make impulse purchases. Make sure there is a pre-determined reason or objective for a trip to the mall.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.
    • Give kids control of money.  Through control of money and trial and error children will learn how to make better decisions and seize responsibility for their spending in the future, according to Leo Babauta of the zenhabits blog.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.
    • Educate them about managing money.  Teach children to plan their money habits while considering the following measures:

            *   Budgeting

            *   Saving

            *   Investing

            *   Paying bills

            *   Reducing expenses

    • Limit allowances.  Most children have no explanation for why they get an allowance. According to Suze Orman, an allowance is “your first opportunity to teach your children to respect money and that it is something that must be earned.” She recommends using the term “salary” instead of “allowance” in order to instill in kids the concept of earning money from work.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.
    • Teach about dangers of debt.  Educate your kids about credit cards and the dangers of debt before they go to college. Encourage them to stick with a debit card during college. Discussing loans and other debts can help them avoid becoming debt-stricken after graduation.
    • As children get older, limit support you provide.  USNews.com says, “To avoid setting up a cycle of dependence, make sure to limit the financial support you provide. While giving assistance in early adulthood years is helpful, it can also lead to an inadvertent pattern of financial dependence.”  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.

     

    >> Did you teach your kids about how to deal with money?   What works and what doesn’t?  Or are you just beginning to wonder how to approach the topic with your children?  Ask the community their thoughts by replying to this post.

     
  • capfedwomensway 8:25 am on May 6, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Is Your Name Your Destiny? 

    Fast Company recently published an interesting story about the online social networking tool, LinkedIn.  LinkedIn recently offered up lists of the most popular names in certain professions and positions (globally), based on its database of over a hundred million names.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.

    If you named your baby one of these names, are they more likely to become a CEO?


    Top 10 Male CEO Names

    1. Peter
    2. Bob
    3. Jack
    4. Bruce
    5. Fred
    6. Bill
    7. Ron
    8. Christian
    9. Alexander
    10. Don

    Top 10 Female CEO Names

    1. Deborah
    2. Sally
    3. Debra
    4. Cynthia
    5. Carolyn
    6. Pamela
    7. Ann
    8. Cheryl
    9. Linda
    10. Janet

    Check out this cool infographic LinkedIn produced to see other findings.  The highlighted link will take you off the Capitol Federal Savings Bank website. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is not responsible for the contents of the site or any further links from such site. Capitol Federal Savings Bank is providing these links to you only as a convenience, and the inclusion of any link does not imply endorsement of the linked site by Capitol Federal Savings Bank.

     
  • capfedwomensway 10:55 am on April 26, 2011 Permalink | Reply  

    Get Creative with Summer Child Care 

    The school year is nearing an end – do you have plans for the kids this summer?

    It can be a challenge to come up with a plan that excites, educates and entertains your child(ren), but doesn’t bust your household budget.  There are alternatives to the traditional full-day summer camp, but it takes some planning.

    • Create a Child Care Co-Op
      Talk with other families in your neighborhood or in your child’s class at school about sharing child care coverage.  Each parent can take a week of vacation to watch the group, depending on the size of your group.  Consider how many kids everyone in the co-op can fit in their car, the compatibility and interests of the group, a convenient meeting place and drop-off/pick-up times, and each family’s expectations of the group. The co-op can not only save the cost of summer camp but bring a nice variety to the summer, as every parent is sure to bring different ideas and plans to the group.  And, the co-op idea can extend to days the kids are off during the school year too.
    • Find a Responsible College Student
      Ask your friends, family, coworkers and neighbors for recommendations of college students who might be looking for summer work. Meet with the potential summer nanny, and determine if he or she is prepared to provide more than just ‘babysitting’. Find one who is enthusiastic to put together a plan for summer with the kids, mixing fun with structured activities. Clearly outline compensation and expectations in writing.
    • Check Out Day Camps
      Research day camps available in your area at high schools, universities, churches, community centers and parks.  There are camps available for many interests, from academic to athletic to crafts or hobbies.
    • Find Volunteer Opportunities
      Seek out organizations that might be looking for volunteers.  Your student can learn skills while providing community service.  Look to churches, parks and recreation programs and local philanthropies for opportunities in your community.

    >> What do you have planned for the kids to do when school is out?

    >> What do you feel is a suitable age to allow young people to stay on their own during the summer?

    >> Would you prefer if your school system offered year-round classes?

     
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